About the Research

School chaplains do a great job promoting social, emotional and spiritual wellbeing in schools. We know this because we hear story after story about the amazing contribution they make to the lives of students, families and staff – the people who know chaplains, work alongside them and directly benefit from their work. This report tells this story in a different way – through data, graphs and infographics.
Throughout 2017, we collected information on the demographics, activities and impact of our school chaplains. This came from two main sources:

  • The ‘Chaplaincy Activities Survey’ conducted in term 2, 2017. In this survey, we asked school chaplains to record information from their pastoral conversations across one week and to record their involvement in programs and activities across the term. The sampling frame of this survey was 100% (582 chaplains) and the response rate was 64.26% (374 chaplains).
  • General demographic information from SU QLD chaplaincy employment data.

Please note, this report does not include all information received. Rather this ‘snapshot’ serves to provide insight into the key areas of chaplaincy that people are most interested in.

A big ‘thank you’ to the school chaplains, field workers and administrative staff who gave their time to record and retrieve data; to the staff at McCrindle who helped us put together our ‘Chaplaincy Activity Surveys’ and supported the infographic design process. Finally, thank you to SU QLD staff who crunched numbers, interpreted data and designed infographics to help us better understand the story of school chaplaincy.

Download the Snapshot

To view the full report, please download the PDF below.

snapshot-pdf-image

Explanatory Notes

Page 1:

Generations
This information was obtained from SU QLD chaplaincy employment data.

Qualifications
This information was obtained from the ‘Chaplaincy Activities Survey’.

Chaplains responded to the question, “What is your highest, most relevant qualification for your chaplaincy role?” In 2017, the minimum qualification for a school chaplain under the National School Chaplaincy Program (NSCP) was a Certificate IV in Youth Work, Pastoral Care or an equivalent qualification. Chaplains could be employed without these minimum qualifications under certain circumstances (eg – appointments to remote chaplaincy positions). These chaplains would still need to meet all other criteria, complete two nationally accredited units in referral and mental health and commit to ongoing study towards the minimum qualifications within three years.

Gender
This information was obtained from SU QLD chaplaincy employment data.

What does a School Chaplain do?
Chaplains responded to the question, “Please estimate the percentage of time you spent on the following parts of your role during the week.”

What is the Impact of a School Chaplain?
These quotes came from interviews conducted separately to the Chaplaincy Activity Surveys. Parental permission was given for promotional purposes at the time of the interview.

Page 2:

Who do School Chaplains talk to?

  • Chaplains responded to the questions, “How many [formal and informal] pastoral conversations have you had with [students, parents/carers and staff] this week?”
  • Chaplains also responded to the questions, “How many [formal and informal] pastoral conversations have you had with [students, parents/carers and staff] this week?” And “In a regular working week, how many days do you work in your chaplaincy role?”
  • The average number of days worked by chaplains is 3.4 days, this total was rounded down to the closest whole number. The number of pastoral conversations per week had with students, staff and parents/carers were rounded from 23.29, 8.95 and 5.19 (respectively) to the nearest whole number.

How do School Chaplains help students?

  • Chaplains responded to the question, “What were the main issues for the students that had ‘formal’ pastoral conversations with this week?” to find the top 5 issues students talk to chaplains about.
  • Chaplains responded to the questions, “How many [formal and informal] pastoral conversations have you had with students?” to find how many formal and informal conversations chaplains have with students every year.
  • Chaplains responded to “How many times this week did you meet with the following school-based and community support staff?” and “If you undertook any off-site visits in Term 2 of this year, where were they to?” to find the number of meetings with other staff and community groups. The totals provided are PER WEEK.

Page 3:

What other ways do School Chaplains provide support?

  • Chaplains responded to the question, “Did you run any of the following [social and emotional, grief and loss, spiritual support, role modelling/mentoring, community development, educational support] programs in term 2?”

What does School Chaplaincy look like?

  • This interview was conducted separately to the Chaplaincy Activity Surveys. Parental permission was given for promotional purposes at the time of the interview for images.

Page 4:

Do School Chaplains work with At-Risk students?

  • Chaplains responded to the question, “Of the students that you had ‘formal’ pastoral conversations with this week, how many of them would identify with the following categories?”

Where are our School Chaplains?

  • This information was obtained from SU QLD chaplaincy employment data.

Download the Snapshot

To view the full report, please download the PDF below.

in-partnership-with-mccrindle-crop

See how your support impacts young lives
Sign up to our monthly e-News